I Completely Failed This Week… And That’s Ok

completely failed this week

I have a confession to make… This was one of the most unproductive weeks I have had in months. In fact, I completely failed to write the articles I had planned, I completely failed to return some important emails, and I completely failed to stick to my normal research process.

But despite these failures, I consider the week to be a success.

Let me explain…

This Week, I Completely Failed to Accomplish My Goals

I had big plans for this past week.

This was the first week in August, plus we’re in the middle of the second quarter earnings season. That means there are plenty of economic data points, company-specific releases, and analyst reports to pour over.

I set personal goals to cover a lot of ground this week. Including:

  • Discussing the strength in consumer spending
  • Writing about several stocks on my watch list
  • Analyzing the US jobs report for July
  • Finishing our series on credit option spreads
  • Posting some thoughts on ex-dividend dates
  • And more…

And yet I completely failed. None of those posts actually made it to this site (yet).

No, I wasn’t lazy. I didn’t spend the week binge-watching Netflix, or sitting on a beach. Instead, there were a number of family and personal responsibilities that took my time…

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Monday was the first day of school for my 7-year-old twins. They wanted their dad to take them to school and help them get settled in on Monday. How could I refuse??

On Tuesday, I had an MRI scan on my knee after injuring it last week. I found out Friday that I crushed a bone in my joint, which means no running for the next eight weeks (boooo!!!).

My 11-year-old daughter had an in-patient surgery which included a bone graft. She asked me to be the one to stay with her overnight, and we had a sweet time together as she recovered.

Basically, there were several “life issues” that kept me from my normal work routine. There were times I felt like I was back in my sleep deprivation experiment!

Sometimes You Dig Deep and Make it Happen…

It takes a lot for me to miss goals I set for myself. When I say I’m going to do something, I usually move heaven and earth to make it happen.

I’ve pulled multiple all-nighters. I have missed family vacations. And I’ve locked myself in my office until projects were complete… Just because I was committed to finishing the job.

Sometimes this has been a good thing.

And some of my decisions to “dig deep” and accomplish goals have hurt the ones I love most.

As a general rule, a commitment to meeting goals is a good thing. Setting (and accomplishing) goals has been a big part of my work success. And this has helped me provide for my family.

That’s a very important thing for me. As you can see on the home page of this site, my mission is “helping families build income so they can focus on what really matters.”

And that starts with my own family.

…But Sometimes You Adjust on the Fly

But even though setting (and accomplishing) goals is an important part of my life, I’ve learned the importance of exceptions.

A lot of these exceptions come from competing priorities.

For example, there were three priorities competing for my time this week:

  • Providing for my family by generating income
  • Helping other families by writing good content
  • Being a good father to my young children

My work routine goals for the week were focused on the first two priorities. I completely failed to accomplish those goals.

But my third priority (and these are definitely not ranked in order of importance), took precedence. This week, I had to adjust on the fly. That meant dropping some of the goals I set for my week, in favor of new (and more important) family goals.

Always Learning, and Striving For Life Balance

My family will tell you that adjusting on the fly is hard for me.

I love to plan and organize my time. And when something happens to change that plan, I feel uncomfortable and out of control.

As the father of seven kids, this is a challenge I’ve had to work on a lot. I’m sure I don’t have to tell you there are a lot of plans that have to be changed because of our family dynamics.

This year, one of my goals is to pursue a better “life balance.” That means focusing on being a better dad. I want to set an example for my kids, showing them that you can be successful with your work, and still enjoy life along the way.

A lot of the books I’ve read in the past, cover the importance of setting goals and sticking to them. And I still believe this is an important concept.

But this week, as I completely failed to accomplish my work goals, I learned some great lessons about life balance.

I’d love to hear from you about this topic.

What are your goals for next week? For next year? For your life?

Have you ever completely failed to accomplish a goal? What did you take away from the experience? How can you adjust goals in the future, to give you and your family a better life balance?

I’d like to hear about your experience. You can email me (Zach@ZachScheidt.com) or simply leave a comment on this post.

Just some things I’m thinking about this morning…

Have a great weekend!

2 Comments

  • charles sturdevant says:

    Don’t try to recreate peak experiences every time. Instead, just accept them as the gift that they are, and don’t beat up on yourself for not being able to stay there. Because if you stayed there, they wouldn’t be peak experiences. They would be normal, every day in time, hum drum, boring experiences. So, savor the peak experiences and compliment yourself upon your achieving of them, and expect more of them, and leave everything else out of the equation.
    Most of all, be joyful in all you do and others in your life will pick up on that vibration, thus making their lives better just by observing how you react to anything that might be less than expected.. Joy is your greatest gift to others!
    End of sermon!

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